10th September 2018


Rosalind Whitehouse


Conserving Paintings
in Country Churches 

 

 

 

This talk describes the typical, and sometimes extreme,

damage suffered by paintings in churches, and gives case

histories of successful conservation and restoration

projects.

Many people are typically involved in such processes: the

Vicar, The Diocesan authority, the architect, the builder, the

Parochial Church Council, the scaffolders, the transport

manager and the conservation team.

Everything must be documented before, after and during

the conservation work.

 

8th October 2018


Pauline Chakmakjian


The City of Kyoto and the Cult of Beauty

 

 

Kyoto in Autumn: Google Images

 

Truly one of the most beautiful cities in the world, this is an

overview of the most stunning monuments and sites found

in Kyoto, the former capital of Japan.

Kyoto not only has magnificent shrines, temples and

gardens, but also is famous for its array of marvellous and

seasonal festivals.

 

 

12th November 2018

Nicole Mezey

The Art of Stained Glass

 

 

Stained glass window - detail: Google Images

The work of art is not just a symbol of creative genius but a

historical object and the result of a laborious process of creation.

This lecture looks at the development of stained glass, its

purpose, the process by which it was created and some of the

extraordinary survivals.

From vast cathedrals to tiny chapels, we concentrate on the

Middle Ages but consider, too, the reason for the decline in

popularity of this once pre-eminent art form and some of the projects 

in which it has been reconsidered and revived. 

 

 

Members are invited for a pre lecture drink from 7pm

 

                                 

 

10th December 2018

Barry Venning

Giles: his life, times and cartoons 

 

 

'Granny' cartoon: Google Images

 

Carl Giles said that Grandma Giles - that fearsome, black-

clad, gambling, drinking battle axe - allowed him to say

things through his cartoons, that he was too polite to say in

person. She helped him poke fun at authority form Hitler to

traffic wardens and even his employers the Daily Express.

 

 

January 14th 2019


Timothy Wilcox

The Jewel in the Crown:

Sir Edward Lutyens and the Building of the

Viceregal Lodge

 

 

 

Detail - Viceregal Lodge: Google Images 

Edwin Lutyens undertook the largest single dwelling erected in

modern times devising a style that incorporated elements of Indian

architecture. Since the last Viceroy [Lord Mountbatten] handed the

building over to the Government of India in 1947, it has rarely been

open to the public. The lecture is illustrated largely with archive

photographs, brought to life by personal memories of the lecturer who

lived in the Palace Grounds as curatorial advisor to the President,

possibly the only non-Indian ever to do so. 

 11th February 2019

Rupert Willoughby

Basingstoke and its contribution to world culture  

 

 

 

 

 One of the most derided towns in England, renown for its

dullness, Basingstoke is distinguished only by its numerous

roundabouts and absurd Modernist architecture. Rupert

explains that the post-war planners, who inflicted such

features as 'The Great Wall of Basingstoke' on the town,

were politically motivated and bent on destroying all traces

of its past. One of the most derided towns in England,

renown for its dullness, Basingstoke is distinguished only by

its numerous roundabouts and absurd Modernist architecture.

Rupert explains that the post-war planners, who inflicted such

features as 'The Great Wall of Basingstoke' on the town, were

politically motivated and bent on destroying all traces of its past.

 

 

 

                               11th March 2019
    


Mark Purcell


The Country House Library

 


 

Library Interior: Google Images

Mark Purcell, Deputy Director of Research Collections at Cambridge

University Library, shows just how important and fundamental, and

the rooms that contain them, were to the intellectual, creative, and

social life of the country house.

 

 

  8th April 2019


Leslie Primo


Foreigners in London 1520 - 1677:  

The Artists that changed the course of British History 


 

 

 

 Henry VIII by Holbein: Google Images

Why were foreign painters preferred by the aristocracy in London to

English painters, why did foreigners come in the first place, what was

their motivation, and what was the impact of foreigners in London on

English art and art practice? The lecture will look at the various

formats and uses of art, tracing foreign artists from the Tudor period

through to the Renaissance and the Baroque, looking at their origins

and how they came to work in England.

 

 

13th May 2019


Daniel Snowman

The Hitler Émigrés :

Their Impact on the British Artistic and Cultural Life

 

Red Shoes film poster: Wikipedia

What do these have in common: The Penguin Pool at London Zoo; the

Glydnebourne and Edinburgh Festivals; the publishers Phaidon and

Thames and Hudson; Pevsner's Buildings of England; 'The Red Shoes'

and the Amadeus Quartet?


Each was created by émigrés from Central Europe who found refuge

in Britain. Artists, architects, film makers, musicians, publishers,

historians, psychologists and scientists: all brought something of their

continental legacy to Britain. Their collective talent was enormous and

their influence far in excess of their numbers.